037: The Money Master | Sandy Yong

Sandy Yong is the author behind The Money Master. Today on EFIC, she discusses her book and her journey into FIRE. Sandy also shares her experiences as a keynote speaker, real estate and stock investor, and financial coach—all of which she does on the side, along with her day job!

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Money Mechanic
Hello, listeners. Welcome to Explore FI Canada, where we sit at the roundtable with Canadians, and share their thoughts, ideas and personal journeys to financial independence.

Thanks to Matt McKeever for sponsoring Explore FI Canada. Matt is a Canadian investor, CPA, entrepreneur, and real estate expert who achieved FIRE at age 31. Do us a favour and check out his YouTube channel by searching Matt McKeever or using the link in our show notes.

Okay, here we go again on Explore FI Canada, Money Mechanic with you. And of course Chrissy is with me today. Good afternoon, Chrissy.

Chrissy
Hello, Money Mechanic. How are you doing on this sunny day?

Money Mechanic
I am loving the summer. We are taking a break from the sun which actually feels nice because I’m up in the middle of the island and it is hot 30 plus up here. So while we are inside for this brief moment of the day here, we also have a guest with us today. Welcome to the show. It is Sandy Yong, and she is the author of The Money Master. Welcome to the show, Sandy, nice to have you here today.

Sandy
Thank you for inviting me to be on your show. I’m very excited to share some of my insights with your audience today.

Money Mechanic
Well, it’s always a pleasure. And you were kind enough to send us a copy of your book, which Chrissy and I both, it’s funny because we got it. And we messaged each other like later that night after it showed up in the mail and like, have you read it yet? And she’s like, yeah, I have. I’m like, Oh, me too!

Chrissy
Well, that’s one of the things I like about this book. It’s such an easy read, like it’s not the slog that you have to get through. It’s very approachable very quick. It’s it’s really nice for people who are just getting started.

Money Mechanic
Yeah, absolutely. I agree with that. And before we get deep into the book, and you can tell us all about that, why don’t you start off and just let our listeners know a little bit about yourself, Sandy, and what brought you to where you are today?

Sandy
Sure, I’d love to so of course, my name is Sandy Yong, and I am the award winning author of The Money Master book. I am based here in Toronto, Canada. And for myself, I did go to business school here in Toronto. And when I graduated, which was about a decade ago, in 2008 2009, this was during our economic recession, which is kind of bring back some memories as now that we go through the global pandemic and we’re seeing some layoffs and people being out of work and and some trying times and so, for me, I started working within the hospitality and tourism industry as an event planner. I did that for a couple years and really putting in overtime hours and making a modest salary. But I knew that I wanted to achieve life milestones so whether it was saving up for a car or my dream home and a wedding and of course going on vacation every year two eventually retiring so I wrote down the goals I wanted to achieve. set some target date and figure out how much I needed to save up for each goal. And from there, I was like, Okay, well, how do I track it and that’s where I knew that I had to open up an RRSP and TFSA. So I went to one of the big banks, like most people and naively bought high-fee, high-risk mutual funds and ended up losing thousands of dollars. And that’s, that was really frustrating as an early 20-something year old, not really knowing what to do, but felt like I was doing the right steps. And that’s where I really wanted to take matters into my own hands and do my own research, make sure that I was educated and armed with the right information, so that I was setting myself up for success and not relying on the financial institutions to kind of guide me and I want to make sure that I had the right building blocks to ensure that I had a safe and sound investment portfolio that would stand the test of time and that’s where I was able to generate six figure investment portfolio through the stock market by the age of 27. And even then it was like a personal goal. But I didn’t really tell anyone. I was hard to talk about it with friends, family, colleagues, just because like, around the office, like people don’t really share about how much they make or what their financial goals are. And you see all these Canadian stats out there, where a lot of Canadians are struggling so but from there, I was part of Toastmasters working on my public speaking skills. And then two years ago, my husband and I decided to write a book and that’s where I had my light bulb moment where I could combine my passion for professional speaking and have a platform to educate millennials on financial literacy and and teach them how they can create multiple streams of income and achieve financial stability.

Money Mechanic
I think you make a great point there because the first line on near the back cover your book says the topic of money makes people feel anxious and overwhelmed. I think he’s just sort of hit that nail right on the head. There’s that discussion is not. It’s nice to be part of this FI community now and sharing this podcast so that we can have this discussion and share it with other people, for sure. You went to FinCon 2019, which I’m really jealous because I wanted to go this year, but that’s not actually going to happen. But it sounds like you started your journey around the similar time for a lot of us. I think it was after that financial meltdown, 2008, things like that. But you hadn’t really started focusing on financial independence until you’re exposed to the Playing With FIRE movie at FinCon. And you heard about it on some other podcasts. How did everything that you were working towards before that point? Did you have a pivot or was it just something that you’d been building towards and then you’re like, oh, now I’ve got some destination type thing to your investing?

Sandy
Yeah, it’s been quite interesting. I mean, all of the personal finance books that I read about really talked about creating financial goals like having a plan, like I had, I was still to you, I still have an Excel sheet that I created in my early 20s that mapped out like every single year, how much I would save, and then cumulative over decades until I thought I would retire the classic age of 65. And I would keep track of it on a quarterly basis, and for sure, a yearly basis to monitor and adjust it. And then yeah, it wasn’t until my husband Albert and I went to FinCon 2019. And when we saw the Playing With FIRE movie, that’s when it really opened up our eyes to this whole FIRE community that we didn’t really know too much about. But we definitely aligned our values and our goals too. And it was really an interesting take to see like what people do in order to make those behavioral changes and lifestyle change. And, and to explore like, what is the meaning of FIRE and financial independence and retiring early. And so that’s where it really helped, I guess bring this to the forefront of our of our marriage and to sit down and reflect like, what do we want from a decade from now or two decades, like, what will our future look like? And even when we do reach FI, what do we want to continue to do after that. And so that’s where it definitely inspired us to set a date of when we want to achieve financial independence and set even bigger and you have bigger goals for ourselves outside of our full time jobs.

Chrissy
So I’d like to dig in a little bit more about that journey into FI for you because a lot of people who are in the general personal finance space, when they discover FIRE, they get turned off, they actually want to run in the other direction because there’s a lot that they find confronting about it. And that’s a little little bit challenging. So what is it about you and your husband that both of you took it and really ran with it once you discovered it?

Sandy
I think for us like we’ve we’ve found so far like a happy medium. I think there are there’s the extreme end of people making super big sacrifices and lifestyle changes in order to reach it really quickly. But I think for us, like we’ve been able to find a nice balance where we can still enjoy the day to day activities and not sacrifice too much and still enjoy. Yeah, like are we can date and going out to a restaurant once a week, or order takeout, I guess more so during these time? Yeah. But um, yeah, I think for us, it was just I guess for us we’re real. We’re very ambitious and we like to have goals in mind. And to know that for us like to have financial independence means that we are not fully reliant on our full time jobs, because nowadays, like, even if you do have a full time job, like we’re very fortunate we’re able to work from home and have full time income and pursue all of our or other businesses, whether it’s speaking and consulting, writing a book, we can still do that on a part time basis. But hopefully, it can grow. And then that way, we’re growing multiple, multiple streams of income and planting those seeds at the same time. So yeah, I think it’s just for us is just setting a goal and just going after it and just having that freedom to again, like do whatever we want to do.

Money Mechanic
So common theme here, it keeps coming up. And again, and again. And this is important for our listeners to pick this up. And each and every show that we do is multiple streams of income. We keep hearing this from just about everybody and I’m working on my own trying to increase multiple streams of income. And I think that’s, we talked about the beginning of this journey and the beginning of investing about keep it very simple. Being a low-cost broad-based diversified ETF. But as you get further down the road towards into your journey of FI once you build up some confidence and you’ve read some good books and things like that, you want to start working towards the multiple streams and for you, you mentioned that you also I like your little I like dividend stocks too. And, and you’ve also got some real estate assets going. So just briefly give us a little bit of a big view of what your investment portfolio and those apart from your book, obviously, because that’s a huge income stream, I hope. But yeah, some of the other things that you’ve got, and how did that journey look like from the beginning? Did you start simple just with ETFs and then get more complicated or what’s that portfolio look like?

Sandy
For me, one of my, I guess one of the best resources I would recommend and that I learned from was from the Money Sense Magazine, how to create a guide on how to create a perfect portfolio and this is like back in 2011.

Money Mechanic
Is that Dan Bortolotti who wrote that? Probably, right?

Chrissy
I read it. It’s an excellent guide. You can’t buy it anymore. It’s…

Sandy
Oh really?

Chrissy
Yeah. It’s wonderful. Yeah.

Sandy
Yeah. And so I took that and was able to take my mutual funds from a financial institution, go with an online brokerage and have that confidence to create my own investment portfolio. And then from there, like every year, I would, from my savings invested into my RRSP and TFSA. And then eventually, I would reach those max capacities and how to open up a non-registered account and grow it from there. And then so that’s kind of like the first step that I took. I think that was the easiest for me, just because when it comes to the stock market, the barriers of entry are pretty low. Maybe you can start off with a couple hundred or $1,000 and get your feet wet and then gradually go from there. And nowadays, it’s just so much easier. The technology, the accessibility and I mean, almost anyone can have access to create their own portfolio now with robo advisors on the market, I mean, there’s really is no excuse to get started. Then with real estate, it wasn’t until I met my now husband, his parents taught him how to do real estate investing, specifically in owning condo units within the Greater Toronto Area. And that’s where I definitely had a hunger to learn more about it and become a landlord and to be able to take care of our tenants and especially when like growing up, I would play Monopoly with my friends. So I definitely had that kind of taste as a child to know like, hey, like, if you are a real estate owner, then you can definitely make a lot of profit and I guess well quote unquote passive income even though there’s definitely a hands on work I would say more so than the stock market. Yeah, but there’s definitely like huge potential in the real estate market especially young, all you know, and in Vancouver and Toronto, they’re like the hottest markets in Canada. And there’s, there’s always opportunities to invest in real estate.

Money Mechanic
For sure, for sure. And I think especially around your area, I’ve been looking in the some of the secondary markets around Toronto that are sort of an hour outside and there there’s some really hot markets there too. And I think another I mean, great story that that you got involved with that with Albert, your husband there. And I just want to mention because I see a lot of threads online where people think that you can’t have a passive investment in real estate. There are get into it and do some research and learning about it because there’s joint venture partnerships there’s rent to owns. There’s other strategies out there that don’t involve you cleaning toilets or fixing broken water pipes, which is like the classic everyone’s like, I don’t want to be a landlord. So anyway, I just want to throw that out there. Chrissy, should we dig into the book a little bit?

Chrissy
Yeah. That’s a big part of your life right now. Your book didn’t come out very long ago. Was it just this summer that it came out?

Sandy
It came out in November 2019. And then I had my official. Yeah, I had my official book launch party at the end of February in Toronto, right before the whole lockdown happened. So I was really fortunate. Yeah, my book launch.

Chrissy
So you just squeaked in there with that. So I wanted to ask you more about what inspired you to write the book and who is the book written for?

Sandy
Yeah, so for myself, like going through and finding success with the stock market and then, you know, starting out in real estate and reading dozens and dozens of personal finance and investing books, I felt like I had so much knowledge to share. But for years I struggled with like, how can I share this with my peers and other millennials and when when I was talking to my coworkers or my friends, I would hear stories about like how they would still be living paycheck to paycheck or they hadn’t paid off their student loans and, or they would have to support their parents like the elderly. And these are real struggles that our Canadians are facing. And so when my husband Albert, back in January 2018, his new year’s resolution was to write a book, and I was like, Oh, that’s great, honey. Like, I’m fully supportive, you know, like, go for it. And then I had no intention of writing a book, like it was not on my radar like, was not one of my personal goals. But it wasn’t until we found out through social media about a book writing seminar. It was in Toronto and so my husband and I decided to go attend. And we had already had a bunch of friends, especially within our Toastmasters circle, who were professional speakers. And also came out with a book. And we knew that if we really wanted to build our speaking business, that in order to be taken seriously, that you have to have a book and like if you look at all the big names on stage like Tony Robbins, Rachel Hollis, they all have books, because it builds your credibility. And after the book writing seminar, I had my aha moment where I was like, wow, like, by writing a book, I it will open up doors of opportunity. It will help with expanding our speaking business. We can go consulting or coaching, having workshops and this was really like my way to now give back to the community and help teach female millennials on how they can generate their six figures through investing. So that’s where I really got started. And we partnered up with our book publisher Lockhart books and took about a year and a half With a lot of perseverance and late nights, many evenings and weekends sacrifice, but we were able to both my husband and I, we wrote individual books at the same time.

Chrissy
That’s incredible. And what is your husband’s book about just quickly?

Sandy
Yeah, so his book is called Checkmate: How to Win the Sales Game in Healthcare. So his book focuses on teaching healthcare professionals to boost their sales.

Very cool.

Money Mechanic
Interesting.


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Money Mechanic
Now, you wrote this book like I’ve read quite a few of the personal finance books in Canada. Some of them are written in sort of a narrative or like a story-type form. But your book here is written more like a workbook. And one of the things that struck me about some of the chapters is that you cover a lot of topics, but you kind of do a nice high level album. If people really wanted to dig deeper they could. Was that your intention with this book to make it something that is more of a step by step for readers?

Sandy
Yes, that’s spot on. That’s exactly what I wanted to do. I just want to give people a variety and a taste of all the different topics out there in the personal finance realm, especially specifically like my three pillars, which focuses on investing in stock market, investing in real estate, and also entrepreneurship, I thought those were kind of three really important topics that I wanted to share with my audience and my readers, especially since I have experience in those three areas. And I wanted to make sure that it was practical. And people will apply the knowledge that they learned because oftentimes, people will read books, but then they don’t do anything with the knowledge that they have. And so that’s why I really tried to drill down at the end of each chapter, give them a checklist, so then they know what actual steps that they can take and start seeing results like immediately. So in that way, they can build the confidence and get over their fears, get over past failures, mistakes that they’ve made, and that way, they can gradually increase our confidence and keep growing their investment portfolio over time and see that they too can they can do it.

Money Mechanic
That’s one of the things I found reading it is, it’s a book that I could probably easily refer to things in the future as I sort of got to another step or whatnot. I just flipped it open here. It’s like stay on track, you know, I’ve got a checklist here, things like that were some of the not to put down any of the other personal finance books that are out there. But when they’re written in a narrative, it’s harder to jump back to a specific spot, and just sort of revisit that information that’s important as you get along this path and build your confidence. So I think he did a great job on that.

Sandy
Great, thank you.

Chrissy
I feel like it’s a good book, I can just hand to even a teenager and just say read it. And you’ll get a good idea of how to become a money master and how to get started. And it gives a good overview of a wide range of topics, including investing basic personal finance, as well as real estate investing, which which are all things that you dabble in, which is, I think, important for a new investor to know that there’s not just one way to grow your wealth.

Sandy
Yeah. And it’s interesting you say that because the feedback that I’ve received some from some of my readers that the parents do pass it on to their teenage kids because they want to have those conversations and open dialogues with them. And this book has been able to open up and start those conversations and teach those foundational sound habits for their teenagers and make sure that they are prepared when they become an adult.

Money Mechanic
Now, we’ve pumped you up, and we’ve told you, we like the book, but now I’m gonna take a shot at you. No, no, it’s nothing. It’s nothing. Nothing drastic at all. I just wish I was just curious. And I wanted to ask you, you included three interviews towards the back of the book. And it was interesting, because I’m just going to quote from the book here’s what should investors considered before they invest in marijuana ETFs? And it was interesting, because I know at the time you wrote that that was a big topic of discussion at the time, and hopefully people didn’t put a ton of money into it, but is it HMMJ or whatever it is. Why did you choose to use these interviews in the book, they they kind of broke for me when I was reading it. They broke away from the workbook style flow that you had going on. I kind of didn’t get a lot from them. So I just was curious to hear what your take on why you put them in there.

Sandy
Yeah. So I did interview several industry experts, whether it was in the cannabis industry or real estate to law, and I wanted to share different perspectives from industry experts on what their take is based on what was kind of trending recently and to give readers, I guess, yeah, kind of like a panel interview. And to highlight some of the other financial experts, I even have Ellen Roseman there and she’s been in the industry for decades now. So just to kind of share different perspectives and and shed some light on maybe other things that are may not have had expertise or experience in and just to hear from other voices.

Money Mechanic
Yeah, no, that totally makes sense. That’s kind of where I figured you’d be going with that. But anyway, Chrissy, moving on.

Chrissy
Yeah. So I’d like to talk to you about another area that you have a lot of expertise in. I see you as a multi passionate entrepreneur. I don’t know if you’ve heard of Marie Forleo. But she’s big on that this multi passionate thing where you just have so many interests, and there are things that you’re really, really passionate about. And it’s okay to have different passions and to explore all of them. And so you not only are an author, but you have a day job. You’re also a keynote speaker and amongst other things, so tell me more about that. How did you get into this multi passionate kind of entrepreneurial journey that you’re on?

Sandy
Yeah, that’s a great question. Wow. I would say that I probably I got this when I was very young. My father, my late father, he worked in the restaurant industry, but I remember him telling me stories about how he would partner with his friend. And one time they owned a fortune cookie factory to a soy sauce factory. And I think by seeing like my father, like working really hard in the restaurant industry, it really showed me like what the potential could be by being an entrepreneur. And yeah, I guess my dad was just very hardworking, and helped to provide for a family and I always had different business ideas and I even during school, when I was in elementary school, my friend and I would make these handmade bracelets and then during recess, we would sell them maybe for like, I don’t know, 25 cents or $1. Who knows? I guess I kind of just had that got that taste of what it’s like being a business owner. And it was just really exciting. And I would just bounce off different business ideas throughout. And then it wasn’t until after several years of working in the, in the hospitality industry and just kind of being overworked and realizing that my full time salary at the time wasn’t really reflecting what my true potential was or what it could be. And I knew that I was kind of… well, yeah, I guess destined for more than that. I had other passions outside of my full time career and even with my full time career I’ve gone from, from conference planning to procurement and now product management. So I see myself as a bit of a chameleon, working my way through different industries and try new things. And I think that as human beings like we’re there’s always room for for learning and growth and to try new things, no matter how young or old we are, and just to kind of explore, like, maybe some hidden passions that we never knew that we had. And so and I’m really fortunate that I’m able to be in a position where I have full time income, but then also can develop businesses on the side and even for my husband, like we’re able to support each other as well. So yeah, I encourage other people to do it too. And I definitely share that in my book to get people to reflect on what their talents are and explore what they can do especially now during the pandemic when we’ve seen massive layoffs and people really struggling to find work and so why not really think about like what your your passions aren’t maybe your talents you can turn into profit.

Chrissy
Well, this ties back to what Money Mechanic was saying about multiple income streams, right? You You really have that down. You have many, many income stream streams, which is fantastic. And my next question then is how this ties into your FI journey? Is this part of the plan that maybe your day job will end? And then you’ll be able to pursue these passions as your part time gig? And would it be a semi-retirement for you or something? I don’t know if you’ve heard of Coast FI, which is what Money Mechanic is currently pursuing. What does that look like? How do all these things tie into your FI journey?

Sandy
Yeah, I think for us, I mean, it wasn’t until we went to FinCon last year that we really explored more into FI I think for us like I think it’s kind of always a changing or evolving plan. Right now we are planning to reach our FI date of September 2029. And for us, I think that creating multiple streams of income will definitely help us reach our FI goals much faster or else we would have to be working for much longer. And I think that anything can happen like for, for the time being like, I’m still happy, where, where I’m at with my full time career, and there’s definitely a lot of growth and potential there. And then who knows, like, for me, I’m also very passionate with when it comes to public speaking now more so in a virtual format. But I think that Yeah, for us, we definitely want to be able to travel more when the time is right and when it’s safe, to go more on on annual vacations. And just to kind of, yeah, focus more on spending time with friends and family because we know at the end of the day, like your relationships matter the most. And if you’re working all these hours and you don’t have those strong relationships with your friends and family, then what are you like, doing all this for right, so yeah, so that’s like for us For, we have a dream board, or a vision board that we look at, and we’re constantly modifying whether it’s our professional goals, financial goals, or so many things, materialistic things with new skills. We want to learn legacies, we want to leave all those things like we put on our vision board that we look at every day. And we have conversations about just see if we’re on track, and if it’s still something that makes us fulfilled at the end of the day.

Money Mechanic
So it sounds like living a life of you know, purpose and options and intentionality, which is great to hear that sort of what we’re all trying to achieve in this FI journey. I have a quick question. Going back to the book a little bit here. You It sounds like you wrote this a little bit before you went to FinCon and had your let’s call it the FIRE epiphany. And maybe I’ll put you on the spot here. Is there going to be a second edition with a chapter interviewing Chrissy about financial independence or would you there’s a lot of great insight and knowledge in here. Would you have tweaked it a little bit after you’ve the FIRE journey, would you have added a chapter or something like that?

Sandy
Hmm. Yeah, so I did start writing the book in 2018. And by the time we went to FinCon afterwards, I had already pretty much written my whole entire manuscript and was in editing. So there wasn’t really too much wiggle room, other than like putting in the acknowledge of the FIRE community. And it’s funny because while I was on my writing journey, and telling people that I was writing a book, a lot of them were like, Oh, hey, Sandy, like, why don’t you do this for your second edition or, or my nose? I’m like, Okay, I’m still working on my first. But now that I’ve come up with the first one yet, there’s definitely I definitely have ideas of if I were to write another edition, to be able to expand on some of the topics. I didn’t get to go too much in detail. I think a chapter on on FIRE would definitely be one of the top contenders there, and which fit quite naturally, as I’m kind of extension of the first book.

Money Mechanic
Yeah, absolutely. And I think there’s there’s so much the good usable content in here already that this is valuable for people regardless of whether they intend to achieve FIRE financial independence. I mean, it’s just, I just wanted to throw that in there because I’ve actually seen a few books where they try and focus on it and it kind of gets away from the actual good nuts and bolts message of intelligent money management for people becoming a money master. Now one of the other things I came across in your bio here is that you are partnered with CAMH. Chrissy you were going to ask about that. I don’t know anything about this.

Chrissy
Yes, I was because I listened to some of your other interviews and you did speak about this and and mental illness is something that’s near and dear to my heart because I had postpartum depression with with my kids. And so I think it’s important to talk about when we can and shed light on it to take away the stigma of mental illness. So I know that $2 of every book sale goes towards CAMH, which is the Center for Addiction and Mental Health. Can you tell us more about your partnership with them? And what is it that motivated you to start this partnership?

Sandy
Yeah, so for myself growing up in a household, my late mother was diagnosed with several mental illnesses. And as a family, we struggled quite a bit, trying to support her and just for each other, and just seeing the struggles that she faced with on a daily basis. It was hard because although she really wanted to hold a full time job, her mental illness took over and she became a home maker to take care of older sister and I and yeah, and it was just, it was it was sad to see that how much of her mental illness affected her day to day activities, her behavior. And just to understand that the way that she might act was out of normal, but it was just something that we had to deal with. And especially within the Chinese community and probably other communities, cultures can relate. But it was tough to share this with relatives or our neighbors or friends and family. And it’s something that I felt like I had to keep secret because other I was afraid that people would judge me. People would think differently of me or I felt ashamed. And there was a lot of guilt and shame surrounding that. And so, I felt that with this book, not only did I want to break the barriers of talking about money, but I also wanted to do the same thing for mental health. And this was also part where now that I’m working for Bell Canada also has their annual Bell Let’s Talk Day. And so that also kind of became a natural transition where I’d already started fundraising money for CAMH, several years ago, my own personal initiative. And then now with this book, I was like, Okay, well, why not also do an official partnership with CAMH and we had several coffee chats and we were able to form a partnership there and they were at our, my book launch and, and now I’m able to help open up and share my story and hopefully that helps other people give gives them comfort in knowing that they’re not the only one and that there are people out there who can help and give you support and CAMH is a wonderful organization. They do a lot of research and they help support families who are in need.

Chrissy
I think that’s wonderful, of you. It’s brave and it’s also very generous of you to be raising money for this worthy cause. And it’s just another reason for our listeners to go and buy your book. It’s supporting a good cause. We do also want to mention that you’re very generous to give us a couple of copies to give away to our listeners, for those who aren’t going to buy the book immediately. Maybe we can try to win it first. So Money Mechanic, how can our listeners possibly win a copy for themselves?

Money Mechanic
You know, I just had a thought. What if we request our kind listeners to make a small donation to CAMH and send us a message. Leave us a message on either the show notes or our Facebook page? Say that you made a small donation to CAMH which is going to be helpful for everybody and you’ll be entered in a draw and we’ll do a random draw for two books. How’s that?

Chrissy
I love that great idea.

Sandy
Yeah, that’s great.

Money Mechanic
Yeah, thanks again for sending us those books. Thanks again for the autographed copies that Chrissy and I have this is an excellent addition to my my bookshelf of growing financial I’ve read so much appreciate it. Thank you so much for coming on the show. It’s great talking with you today, let our listeners know where they can find you.

Sandy
Yes, your listeners can find me on my website, which is Sandy Yong dot com, and that’s spelled sandyyong.com. You can find all the information about me. I’m also on social media media, whether it’s Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram, you can find me at The Money Master book.

Chrissy
Perfect. Thank you very much Sandy. And I should mention that the two giveaway copies are also signed by you they are autographed as well. And we would like our listeners to comment and with their donations by September the 30th. And then we will announce the winners after that. So thank you very much, Sandy. We had a great chat with you today.

Sandy
Thank you guys, this was a lot of fun.

Transcribed by Otter.ai

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